1. Backbend
  2. Yoga

Yoga Backbends Bring Joy To Your Urdhva Dhanurasana

Urdhva Dhanurasana often invokes moans in class. The moment the teacher calls the pose, students tense up and hope there’s only one.

Yoga Backbends Poses

Well, I have just done seven Urdhva Dhanurasanas in a row and wanted more. The warm-up should include several Low Bhujangasanas (Baby Cobras). Approach Baby Cobra with bent elbows aligning elbows directly over wrists.

Separating the sits bones and engaging the abdomen up toward your chest combined with pushing the hips into the floor and drawing the inner thighs up toward the ceiling will allow you to widen the lower back.

A wide lower back is the key to a healthy backbend or yoga backbends. Now pull the heart up toward the ceiling and then let the head fall back. Low Cobra or Baby Cobra actually add more curve to the upper back which is harder to access than the lower back.

Bhujangasana (Full Cobra) and Urdhva Mukha Svanasana (Upward-Facing Dog) can be slightly easier poses for many. Continue using these actions in standing heart openers as well as Ustrasana (Camel).

You’ll know when you’re ready for Urdhva Dhanurasana. Be insistent on parallel feet and do not allow the thighs to turn out. Hips must stay square and not open. Draw the inner thighs down as you come onto the head and pause. And also yin yoga poses are more helpful for relaxation.

If your feet turned outcome down and start again. Then, draw the elbows in and push the chest toward the head. Separate the sits bones and draw the abdomen toward your chest. Push the hips up and draw the inner thighs down.

Notice how the opposing cues work to keep you aligned. Now, widen the lower back. Remember, the wide low back is the key! These are the same actions as Baby Cobra. Push your arms straight into the full expression of the pose.

Check through your cues. Chances are you lost one. That’s okay. Come down and start again. Feel the joy and freedom of this pose with a wide lower back, and you’ll be doing seven or more.